National Program

The CTN Postdoctoral Fellowship Awards Program facilitates research in HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs) and related health conditions by providing funding to candidates who wish to write a trial protocol, research program, and develop and run their own trial. Each award is worth $50,000 plus up to $5,000 in travel allowance on expenses claimed. The fellowships provide career support and are renewable for up to two years. Former CTN postdoctoral fellows from the last two decades include some of Canada’s leading HIV clinical investigators today.

Eligibility

We invite applications from MDs who have completed their medical residency program or PhDs who have completed their PhD. In addition, Biostatisticians with a PhD and working in a HIV or related health conditions group are also eligible to apply.

International Fellowship

One International Fellowship is available to train a scientist who is committed to developing and conducting HIV treatment or prevention research studies in a resource-limited country. The amount of this award will be consistent with local rates and will include travel to semi-annual meetings in Canada. Please refer to the specific guidelines for this fellowship.

If you have any questions about the CTN Postdoctoral Fellowship Awards Program please contact:
MS. JACQUELINE SAS
Manager, Postdoctoral Fellowships and Committees
588-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y6 Canada
Tel: 1-604-806-8381
Tel: Toll free 1-800-661-4664 (in Canada)
Email: jsas@hivnet.ubc.ca

2020-2021 Competition

The competition is now closed.

Postdoctoral Fellowship guidelines:

Canadian Guidelines
Download pdf

International guidelines
Download pdf

Postdoctoral Fellowship Sponsors

Recipients of the 2019-2020 Postdoctoral Fellowship Awards

  • Dr. Tivani Mashamba-Thompson
  • Dr. Haneesha Mohan
  • Dr. Shayna Skakoon-Sparling
  • Dr. Oralia Gómez-Ramírez
  • Dr. Ronita Nath
  • Dr. Kiffer Card
  • Dr. Michaeline McGuinty
  • Dr. Hudson Reddon
  • Dr. Priscilla Medeiros

CTN Postdoctoral Fellow Profiles

Dr. Oralia Gómez-Ramírez

Dr. Shayna Skakoon-Sparling

Dr. Haneesha Mohan

Dr. Tivani Mashamba-Thompson

Dr. Jun Chen

Dr. Kiffer Card

Dr. Hudson Reddon

Dr. Michaeline McGuinty

Dr. Alemayehu Amberbir

Dr. Priscilla Medeiros

Dr. Ronita Nath

Dr. Kayode Balogun

Dr. Mamadou Kaba

Dr. Nasheed Moqueet

Dr. Hanh Thi Pham

Dr. Nisha Andany

Dr. Nancy Nashid

Dr. Nadine Kronfli

Dr. Moleen Zunza

Dr. Malika Sharma

Dr. Chelsea Elwood

Dr. Gisele Ngomba-Kadima

Dr. Margo Pearce

Dr. Nathan Lachowsky

Dr. Gamze Isitman

Dr. Gamze Isitman

Dr. Alexandra King

Dr. Alexandra King

Dr. Connie Kim

Dr. Connie Kim

Dr. Lauren MacKenzie

Dr. Lauren MacKenzie

Dr. Sarah Khan

Dr. Sarah Khan

Dr. Mary-Anne Doyle

Dr. Mary-Anne Doyle

Dr. Wei Cao

Dr. Wei Cao

Dr. Hakimeh Mohammadi

Dr. Hakimeh Mohammadi

Dr. Mohammad-Ali Jenabian

Dr. Mohammad-Ali Jenabian

Dr. Sheetal Patel

Dr. Amy Slogrove

Dr. Agnes Depatureaux

Dr. Agnes Depatureaux

Dr. Jackson Kijumba Mukonzo

Dr. Michelle Science

Dr. Michael Clark

Latest News

The enigma of HIV’s effects on aging

| Uncategorized | No Comments

The average age of people living with HIV in Canada is rising. CTN and BC-CfE researchers are working to understand the factors associated with aging in HIV. This story was originally published by BC-CfE.

Guest Blog: Dr. Haneesha Mohan

| Uncategorized | No Comments

Dr. Haneesha Mohan, CTN Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University Health Network, describes her work on understanding the metabolic diseases and birth defects potentially caused by ARV medications.

Let’s Talk About Stigma: HIV in 2020

| Uncategorized | No Comments

We talked to three community members to get their unique perspectives on the pervasive impact of HIV-related stigma and what we can do to combat it

Could Cannabis Help Prevent HIV-Related Illnesses?

| Uncategorized | No Comments

CTN Investigators Drs. Cecilia Costiniuk and Ali Jenabian publish a thorough editorial review of cannabis research in HIV and inflammation