The CTN is committed to maximizing the impact of research and ultimately improving the health of Canadians by applying knowledge gained through research at home and abroad into applications and practice.

CIHR defines knowledge translation (KT) as a “dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the health care system.”

Studies supported by the CTN follow the CIHR KT model and employ two types of knowledge translation in their study designs: integrated KT (iKT) and end-of-grant KT.

CIHR Knowledge to Action Cycle

End-of-grant KT

The end-of-grant KT approach is primarily focused on disseminating findings to knowledge users. The CTN supports these activities through a number of channels including: peer reviewed publications, presentations, posters, plain language results in the CTN newsletter, annual reviews, websites, community blogs, workshops and through social media.

iKT approach

The integrated, iKT approach emphasizes the role of an engaged knowledge user throughout the research process. Having engaged knowledge users can improve KT activities and helps to ensure that research findings are directly relevant to and used by knowledge users. The iKT approach often includes an end-of-grant KT dissemination plan as well.

CTN Knowledge Translation Resources

STBBIs and the CTN

HIV, Aging, and the CTN

Cure Research and the CTN

Treatment Guidelines

CTN Research Publications

Latest News

Let’s Talk About Stigma: HIV in 2020

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We talked to three community members to get their unique perspectives on the pervasive impact of HIV-related stigma and what we can do to combat it

Could Cannabis Help Prevent HIV-Related Illnesses?

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CTN Investigators Drs. Cecilia Costiniuk and Ali Jenabian publish a thorough editorial review of cannabis research in HIV and inflammation

CHANGE HIV: A Healthy Aging Study

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There is so much we do not know about HIV and aging, but the CHANGE HIV study (CTN 314) is setting out to answer some of these unknowns

CTN 281: Canadian Children Falling Short of UNAIDS target

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A new publication from the EPIC4 Study (CTN 281) found that 73% of Canadian children living with HIV achieved a sustained undetectable viral load